Kids in the Past

Hosted ByBex and Dan

Listen to the diary entries of Edward Hampton and discover what life was like between 1914 and 1918. What subjects were taught at school, what could people do for entertainment and how did children help with the war effort?

Explore what it was like to be a child during different times in history!

Listen to the diary entries of Edward Hampton and discover what life was like between 1914 and 1918. What subjects were taught at school, what could people do for entertainment and how did children help with the war effort?

Then, Dan and Bex have found a book that transports them back to Victorian Britain! They’re exploring all the grim and nasty jobs that children just like you had to do in the past, from picking up poop to popping up chimneys.

Supported by The National Lottery through the Heritage Lottery Fund.


All Episodes

Why Remember (The Great War – Through A London Child’s Eye)

It’s a decade after the start of the war and Edward’s father has died.  At a church memorial service, Edward contemplates the role of memorial in our society in all its aspects.

Personal Remembrance (The Great War – Through A London Child’s Eye)

Many of us remember the fallen from the Great Wars and other conflicts by wearing a poppy.  Edward’s mother and Grandmother talk about the Poppy campaign, and Edward remembers seeing the Scottish troops in London.

Local Memorials (The Great War – Through A London Child’s Eye)

Memorials for the fallen come in many shapes and sizes.  This is mainly due to there not being any rules about what form a war memorial should take but also because different people and communities want to remember and commemorate in different way…

Military Remembrance (The Great War – Through A London Child’s Eye)

Military cemeteries were designed to be peaceful and to be a fair way to remember both rich and poor alike.  Edward visits Brookwood Military Cemetery in Surrey, whilst Sid and his mother argue about John’s place in a cemetery in France. 

National Remembrance (The Great War – Through A London Child’s Eye)

In the aftermath of the war, Britain needed a way to remember their fallen.  The Cenotaph and The Tomb of the Unknown Soldier would become the focus for the nation to remember, particularly on the anniversary of the Armistice.

A Land Fit For Heroes (The Great War – Through A London Child’s Eye)

After the war, the Government said it would look after the returning soldiers, with houses and jobs fit for the heroes they were. The reality was quite different … 

The Armistice (The Great War – Through A London Child’s Eye)

 In the early hours of 11th November 1918, an Armistice Agreement was signed between Germany and the Allies.  This meant that at the 11th hour on the 11th day of the 11th month there would be a truce and an end to the fighting – but pea…

Spanish Flu (The Great War – Through A London Child’s Eye)

The Spanish Flu was a terrible illness that spread across Europe and was brought to Britain by returning soldiers and ships bringing food to feed the starving nation.  It was a pandemic that gripped the country and would end up killing more people…

Women After The War (The Great War – Through A London Child’s Eye)

Until 1918 only some men had the right to vote in elections.  Groups of women, called Suffragettes had protested for many years for women to be able to vote too – sometimes the protests were peaceful but some were violent, causing damage.